Acute Study: Acute kinematic and kinetic adaptations to wearable resistance during vertical jumping

Macadam, Simperingham (4)

 

Purpose Statement:

To compare the effects of different WR placements and magnitudes on vertical jump performance.

 

Introduction:

WR of 3% or 6% BM, attached to either the upper body and lower body (Figure 1), was used to assess the acute effects on CMJ, DJ and pogo jump performance in recreational trained/ sport science student subjects (10 males and 10 females). Loads were evenly distributed for upper body loading, and for lower body, 2/3rd of the load placed evenly around the thigh and the remaining 1/3rd on the shank of the leg.

Figure 1: Upper and lower body WR

 

Key Findings:

  1. Acute significant decreases in jump height (-10% to -17%) were found in CMJ & DJ, due to reduced peak power (-7% to -17%) and peak velocity (-3% to -8%).
  2. No significant effect on landing ground reaction force (GRF) with any condition.
  3. Acute significant increases in contact time (7.9-9.7%) and decreases in flight time (-7.7% to -8.2% with 6% BM only) resulted in significantly decreased reactive strength index (-16.9% to -21.4%) in pogo jumping.
  4. Greater acute decreases found in lower than upper body WR, but no significant difference between conditions.

 

Practical Applications:

  1. Safely overload athletes up to 6% BM without increasing landing GRF with either upper or lower body WR.
  2. Given stability of force measure and velocity decrement, athletes should focus on velocity of movement to improve power output and jump height i.e. CMJ take-off velocity.
  3. May enhance SSC performance in DJ and PJ due to overload requiring extensor strength to reduce contact time and improve flight time and stiffness.
  4. Improved specificity of training was theorised as WR was proposed to be less likely to alter the jump flight path compared to barbell or dumbbell loading.

 

Link to Publication

 

Training Study: Redistributing Load using Wearable Resistance During Power Clean Training Improves Athletic Performance

Marriner, Cronin (5)

 

Purpose Statement:

To investigate how power clean training with WR over a 5-week period effects lower CMJ performance in resistance trained males.

 

Introduction:

WR of 12% attached to the posterior of the upper and lower body (Figure 2) was used to assess the longitudinal effects on the CMJ performance following a 5-week power clean training study. Two groups of eight recreational trained males completed power cleans either with the load redistributed from the bar to the body via WR, or via traditional power clean training. Both groups performed three supervised power clean training sessions per week, following an undulating periodisation model.

Figure 2: Posterior upper and lower body WR of 12% BM

 

Key Findings:

A significant increase in CMJ height (4.2%) was found compared to a decrease for the control group (-1.4%), following a 5-week power clean training study (Table 3).

Table 3: Pre to post changes for CMJ

 

Practical Applications:

Power clean training with compensatory WR would seem a better training method to improve jump height and functional lower body power production.

 

Link to Publication

 

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